Wednesday, October 5, 2016

#IWSG – OCTOBER CHECK IN - “WHEN DO YOU KNOW YOUR STORY IS DONE?”



The awesome co-hosts for the October 5 posting of the IWSG are: 
 Angela Wooldridge, and Susan Gourley!


This is a terrific question, but I've written exactly one story, for #StoryTime Bloghop, that is part of a larger opus. You can read it here at: "The Day The Cat Got Out" I had to stop at 1000 words, as it is a flash-fiction type of challenge and the ending for it is perfect, I think. But, I'm not any good at knowing when a story should be done, or if you just edit your way to an ending and hope for the best.

Now, my father loved to read, when he was alive and he was a champion drinker and philosophizer and when he would get to talking about the authors he enjoyed reading, he would come up with some pretty funny stuff. He never tried to write, but he would say things like, “If I were going to write a story, it would be something like this: [There was a man. He lived and died. The end.] I think it lacks something in the detail, though.” He never took the art of trying to create something very seriously, or rather, he had never really thought the process through.

courtesy:youtube.com                                         

My mom, on the other hand, wrote poetry and I believe she was quite good, but for a long time, she wrote only for herself and would never let anyone see what she had written. She eventually had some of her poetry published and won a few competitions and I read some of it, and while I enjoy it, it's the kind of poetry that I envision ladies of a certain era, say the in early '30s, would read at a summer's tea. Rather innocuous and pretty, painting pictures of little forest animals frolicking or something. I rather expect my poetry to evoke feelings of intense emotion; loss, rage, or passion unleashed. Poetry is a perfect art form, at least to me for emotions such as these. Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach" is one of the finest pieces of poetry I've ever read of this type and it just smacks you in the face at the end. It's one of the reasons I love Shakespeare's plays.

My introduction to poetry was not very secure, although it had its hilarious moments - just ask Robert Lee Haycock - and it wasn't until University that I discovered the poetry of D. H. Lawrence. His poem, “Black Snake” was a revelation to me and I fell in love with poetry from then on. But, as per usual I've entirely digressed.

The truth is this; I don't know when my story is done. I haven't become that mature a writer yet. I seem to be quickly getting to that point, but I cannot give anyone any advice on how to end a story gracefully or even badly. I honestly thought we were going to write about “What Music Means to Me”, and where I got that idea from, I don't know, some kind of wish-fever-dream, since it has NOTHING to do with writing! But, I would have a LOT to say about that! Happy #IWSG'ing.




And Don’t Forget the 2016 IWSG Anthology Contest!
Last year’s contest was science fiction — parallel world/alternate history — and the result wasParallels: Felix Was Here. This year, there’s a new theme and all members are invited to submit.
 Eligibility: Any member of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group is encouraged to enter — blogging or Facebook member. The story must be previously unpublished. Entry is free.
 Word count: 3000-6000
Genre: Fantasy
Theme: Hero Lost. It could be about a hero turned villain, a villain’s redemption, a hero’s lack of confidence, a hero’s lack of smarts, etc. It can be about any kind of hero including superheroes, mythological heroes, unexpected or unlikely heroes, or a whole new kind of hero. This theme has plenty of scope and we’re open to pretty much anything along these lines. No erotica, R-rated language, or graphic violence.
 Deadline: November 1st, 2016
How to enter: Send your polished, formatted, previously unpublished story to admin @ insecurewriterssupportgroup.com before the deadline passes. Please include your contact details and if you are part of the Blogging or Facebook IWSG group.
 Judging: The IWSG admins will create a shortlist of the best stories. The shortlist will then be sent to our official judges.
Prizes: The winning stories will be edited and published by Freedom Fox Press next year in the IWSG anthology. Authors will receive royalties on books sold, both print and eBook. The top story will have the honor of giving the anthology its title.

We’re excited to see the creativity and enthusiasm that’s such a part of this group put into action. So don your creative caps and start writing. And spread the word!

77 comments:

Angela Wooldridge said...

Hi Viola (and fellow co-host!), thank you for your digression. Do you think that was your mum's natural style or how she was expected to write at that time? Do you think her style would be different if she was writing now?
(By the way - the link to your story in your first line is missing).
All the best,
Angela

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

You'll get there.
I could never write poetry, but I think it's similar to writing lyrics for music. The music is the passion and with poetry, the words have to convey all of it.
Thanks for co-hosting today!

Lynn La Vita said...

You have so many rich experiences to draw from! As you continue to express in writing, you and your readers will grow. You passion and drive are an inspiration to all of us. Thank you for co-hosting this months IWSG.

Dean K Miller said...

Greetings Viola and thanks for co-hosting. I was like your mother for many years, never sharing my poetry (except on Jr. College course.) Now, after a couple of books and several published poems, its easier, but still there's times that I keep them hidden. Often it's because I don't think they are "done enough!"

Nicola said...

I admire your determination. Lovely to read about your parents. Thank you for sharing and for co-hosting. Wishing you lots of writing fun and success.

T. Drecker said...

I like you father's story. Simple and to the point :) Keep on writing away! Thanks for co-hosting, too.

Mary Aalgaard said...

It's a good question that's hard to answer. Your parents sound interesting. You got your love of words from them! Thanks for co-hosting this month!
Mary at Play off the Page

Ellen @ The Cynical Sailor said...

Thanks so much for co-hosting! It was interesting to hear about your parent's take on writing.

Cathrina Constantine said...

Thank you for co-hosting!!!!

I never believe my writing is ready, but at some point a writer has to let it go!!

Crystal Collier said...

LOL! I loved the share about your parents. That round about way of reaching a point made me smile and chuckle. We're all at varying degrees of readiness, until some schmo tells us they'd like to publish it and we have to take ourselves seriously.

Diane Burton said...

Thanks for sharing your parents' stories. I admire anyone who writes poetry. Not my skill. You say you're new at this writing biz. That's okay. Keep at it and don't let insecurity deter you. Thanks for co-hosting this month.

Jen Chandler said...

Poetry is a skill I believe you're born with. My grandmother wrote poetry and they were beautiful! My first writing course at university had one week devoted to poetry. It was the hardest week in that entire course but I loved it! While I don't write poetry, I do admire the poet and their resolve to condense so many thoughts and emotions into such tiny structures! Thank you for co-hosting this month and I love the stories you shared about your Mom and Dad :)

Cheers!
Jen

Megan Morgan said...

The unfortunate truth is even 'mature' writers don't always know when something is ready. Sometimes you have to just say "good enough" and cross your fingers. It's a difficult thing!

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I have my lists but really, sometimes it takes a professional read and someone else to tell me my story is done. There's always something to fix.

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

There's something to be said for dads who look at life and see the funny. Your parents sounded pretty wonderful, Viola. Thanks for co-hosting!

cleemckenzie said...

Here's to finding the answer to this question. It's a monster to deal with. Thanks for co-hosting this month.

Christine Rains said...

Your parents sounded like fantastic characters! I always rely on my critique partners to tell me when to stop nitpicking a story. They've never steered me wrong. :)

Jacqui Murray said...

It would seem that with poetry, it's easier to find the finish line. Well, I suppose you could end up writing an epic, like Oedipus. OK, I might do that...

Karen Lynn said...

Congratulations on being Co-Host this month! And thank you. I have to ask, since it's a related question... how do you tell, as a musician, when it's time to stop practicing and get on stage?

Elizabeth Alsobrooks said...

If you do music, your right brain is already fully developed. Writing is just filling in the spaces between the notes. Thanks for co-hosting!

Tamara Narayan said...

I don't think I appreciated poetry much until 12th grade. I had an amazing English teacher who encouraged both the reading and writing of it.

Em-Musing said...

I always know when my story is done, but knowing when the manuscript is ready it different. I'm the Tweak Queen.

Shannon Lawrence said...

Hey, music and writing go together quite well! Maybe a question for the future.

Gail M Baugniet - Author said...

Thank you for co-hosting today, Viola. You wrapped up your blog post with a nice twist so you do have the knack for finishing on an uplifting note. Enjoyed your insightful comments about your parents.

Elsie Amata said...

Thank you for co-hosting!

I love that your mom won awards. Maybe you'll be following in her footsteps?

Cherie Colyer said...

Your parents sound like wonderful people. I used to write poetry in high school. Much like your mom, no one read it. It's great she shared hers.

Thanks for co-hosting.

Toinette Thomas said...

Thanks for co-hosting today and sharing your parent's stories. I tried poetry briefly in high school. While I do appreciate it and like some of it, it's just not for me. I have a feeling, though, it will come back to me later in life.

Nancy Gideon said...

Thanks for co-hosting, Viola. Spread your wings and get moving on a project - he was born, he lived, he died, and fill in the details. Happy writing!

Olga Godim said...

Thanks for co-hosting, Viola, and for sharing your parents' stories. Very inspiring.

emaginette said...

Maybe for you the story is never done. We can't all be the same. :-)

Anna from elements of emaginette

Fundy Blue said...

Hi, Viola! Your posts are always really interesting to read! Thanks for co-hosting the IWSG this month. It is really tough to know when a story is done. That's true for any kind of writing, at least for me. I enjoy poetry, but the thought of writing it terrifies me! When I write, I feel like I'm flailing all over and trying to stay afloat in the water; but there comes a point when I am floating, no more struggling, and it just seems complete. I've found that a good editor or writing critic can always help improve something I think is awesome. LOL I guess I have some maturing to do. Take care. Happy writing in October!

Viola Fury said...

Hello Angela, O ye, of the Holy Pants!

Thank you so much for letting me know about not adding my link. I've been under the weather, and just had extreme dental surgery. I must be crazy to even be out of bed. I did enjoy your post, too.

I don't really know how to answer you about my mom. When she journaled and assumed no one was ever going to read it, she had a hell of a voice. But, that all went away when she began to write poetry. It was too mannered, even treacly and I hate saying that. She was an extremely "authentic" person and lived her life by her lights and expected me to live mine the same way (I didn't always, and there is where we had issues), and I can hardly think that she derived any pleasure from creating poetry like that. I used to try and tempt her with poems like "Black Snake" and "Dover Beach", but she may have been at a time in her life when she just didn't want to deal with sadness and death anymore and I certainly cannot fault her for that. She was writing in the 70s and 80s, so there were poetry readings around and maybe she just liked to write about happy birds and squirrels.

At any rate, I have both my parents to thank for my gifts, both musical and such as they are in the literary world. My father had perfect pitch and my mother was an English teacher. They both loved to read and play word games and I enjoyed those as well. I want to thank you for co-hosting and letting me be a co-host, as well, Angela. Looking forward to #StoryTime Bloghop with Juneta and the crew! Had a blast the last time. Happy #IWSG'ing!


Viola Fury said...

Hi, Alex!

Thanks for stopping by. I adore poetry; it's just such a formidable art form to me, as is writing lyrics. Lyricists throughout the ages have been highly prized, such as Stefan Zweig, whom Reichsminister Richard Strauss thought it would be entirely okay to have him write his librettos for all of his operas during the 3rd Reich, as he had prior to WW II. Zweig was then an emigre in London, Jewish, and Goebbels took a dim view of such shenanigans. Strauss is lucky he was allowed to just resign. Writing lyrics and poetry is not for the faint of heart. I'll stick to prose and playing the viola! I do however, want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for the honor of co-hosting and for being part of this fine group, Alex. I've learned so much about when the story ends. <3

Viola Fury said...

Lynn!

Thank you so much for stopping by today and thank you so VERY much for those kind words. Someone once said to me, and it's lost in the mists of time, but it's true for everyone; we honor those who have gone before us by living each day to it's fullest. It's why you see the Israelis in Israel sitting outside at a cafe, eating lunch, or drinking wine. It's one of the reasons we continue to get up after the loss of a parent, or even if a book is turned down for publication and try again. We continue, because that is how life is lived. We (try) to live it fully and well. Admittedly, I've had some challenges this week and got a little, well, rather huffy with some insurance people on the phone, but ce'est la vie as the saying goes! It all comes right in the end somehow, and I do it in honor, especially, of my mother, who had only one speed, fastest! Thanks again!

Viola Fury said...

Dean!

Thank you so much for stopping by! My mom had taken about a trillion English courses and taught English for nine years. She later went back and received her M.S. in Psychology and worked as a trauma psychologist for people who had been through natural disasters and then with children. But, she always gravitated to writing; I suppose, as a way to deal with some of her own trauma, and then she began to write poetry. I came to it late, when I went back to school a 2nd time for a computer science degree and started reading D. H. Lawrence in my 30s, just 'cause. I didn't have to take course work, but took upper level classes for something to do. I'm in awe of poets; hell, I'm in awe of people who write fiction. I won awards for rhetorical writing, but that process is so very much different. PUT your poems out there, Dean. Never be afraid. One thing I've learned in this world, is there is always something to be gained by doing so; you'll learn something. I'm really happy and proud for you! Thanks for stopping by!

Viola Fury said...

Thanks for stopping by Nicola!

I have to be determined; and I guess, each of us in our own way has to be. My folks were funny. My father would out-Hemingway Hemingway when it came to writing, and my mother would just laugh. They were both canny and worldly enough to have a lot of fun laughing about writers like James Thurber, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Mark Twain, Gogol and Edgar Allan Poe. Being an only child, we would sit around the kitchen table and make up plots from some of their books. I came from a weird family. It's been fun just writing about them and the times I spent with them. I also enjoy my 100% fact-free blog posts! Thanks again for stopping by! <3

Viola Fury said...

T!

Thanks for coming by! I did too! He also drew square dogs. He was a man of many talents. I really must write a post about him some day. Thanks again, and thank you for the honor of allowing me to co-host!

Viola Fury said...

Mary!

Thanks so much for stopping by and for the pleasure of allowing me to co-host (although Alex made that decision) this month's #IWSG. Both of my parents were highly literate and highly educated, so rather than sitting around the television at night, we had a tendency to play "What's the name of the Novel, based on the opening line?" and no one could cheat. I was an only child, so the three of us came up with a lot of different word games. I do not remember a time when I couldn't read, either. My father gave me a copy of Bram Stoker's "Dracula" and Robert Louis Stevenson's "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" when I was 9, and really saw nothing wrong with my reading these books. My mom wasn't terrifically happy about it, but I should mention that both of my folks were born in Scotland and it was natural, especially with the Wallaces, that they were exceptionally well-read. Of course, the biggest downfall here is, it's really hard to go back to the 3rd grade equivalent of "See Spot Run" after "Listen to them, the children of the night! What music they make!"

It led to a few problems until I was tested and then they would just let me pick some books to read and test me at the end of each semester. This went on until high school. I always knew I was going to major in music, so I took as many music classes as I was allowed, but I also took Humanities classes, because they included Western Civilization within the core. It was wonderful. Anyway, I digress!

Thanks again for stopping by!

Viola Fury said...

Ellen!

Thanks for stopping by! I think that rather more what my father was trying to say is that, even though there may be nothing new under the sun, there are fresh takes on everything. In the last year alone, I've seen several shows and read books that come at old stories from new angles. There's not a thing wrong with that. It just takes a little more thought and creativity. My mom probably looked at my dad and said something like, "what do you know, you were stupid enough to fly airplanes with bombs in them and let people shoot at you in the Korean Police Action. Now, there's a SPECIAL kinda stupid!" And, he would have agreed with her. Thanks again for the visit! <3

Viola Fury said...

Catherine!

If you go back up to the top of my blog in the first paragraph, there is NOW a link to a short story I wrote and unleashed upon public eyes for the first time. When I finished it, I knew it was done. It's actually part of a larger piece, set within an EVEN larger piece that is going to be like a "Graphic Novel" and I'm really happy with the outcome of this story. It did everything I wanted it to. If writing were this easy? I'd do it all the time, but I know it's not. I have so many little fits and starts and warped little things that have gone into the cyber-trash, that this is just the lucky scratch-off! Thank you so much for stopping by!

Viola Fury said...

Crystal!

I love you! <3 I can go around more horse's barns and elbows to get to a point than any person I know. What's so hilarious about my parents is my mom probably looked at my dad when he made that remark and said, "Well, what do YOU know? You're stupid enough to fly in airplanes full of bombs and let people shoot at you!" (Korean Police Action) He'd agree with her. I'd look at them both and say, "Neither of you are a prize! You both fly now!" (flying is anathema to me) My dad was an artist when it came to flying. My mother was horrifying; she'd crab and yaw down a runway on take-offs and landings, but she never crashed. I'll write a post about them some day; they were both epic.

I knew my short story was done, because it made sense; does that make sense? Actually, there is a link NOW on the 1st paragraph of this post to "The Day the Cat Got Out" that is a scene from part of a larger piece, that is withing my "Graphic Novel" and it just fit so perfectly, it was time to stop. Thanks, as always for stopping Crystal! <3

Viola Fury said...

@Fundy!

Thanks so much for stopping by! I really love your site and I'm looking forward to reading some of your work. The most salient thing I'm getting from everyone out of all of this is this: "We're all different and we all know it's done in different ways." which I think is great, because the second thing that comes to me is much good and practical advice about how much quicker I can get it to stick-the-fork-in-it's-done stage. With all of this good advice, I know I'll be able to pick up some tips that will work for me. Thanks again for the visit and it's my honor to be your co-host, Fundy! :)

Viola Fury said...

Diane Burton!

Thanks so much for stopping by! It's my pleasure to be your co-host on this IWSG check in! I really try not to let the insecurity get to me. What feedback I've gotten has been very positive and I'm not a thin-skinned type of person when it comes to critiquing; playing the viola after all, is my main gig and you have to have skin like a shark to get through some of that nonsense! Anyway, I am enjoying this, and the camaraderie with all of the IWSG'ers! :)

Viola Fury said...

@emaginette!

I think it's done; I just need to step away from it, so no one gets hurt. It's like playing a piece of music; you can over-practice and make it stale. The same goes with writing. In the 1st paragraph of this post, is a link to my short, short story "The Day The Cat Got Out" and I think it ended quite nicely. There is a resolution and it's logical. I did write a novel for NaNoWriMo2013 and I think the last 1/3 was the same as the first 1/3. I've never gone back and edited it, but I should; it does need a proper ending. Thanks again for stopping by! :)

Viola Fury said...

@Jen!

Thank you so much for stopping by and for sharing your stories and thoughts about poetry. I'm with you on the "being born with" theory, just as one is born with perfect pitch. One of my favorite poets is Billy Collins, our current Poet Laureate and he is simply amazing! I first heard him on Garrison Keillor's "Prairie Home Companion" and I was just blown away. He could convey so many ideas and emotions in so few words and each word was priceless; jewel-like. I have a friend in California who was Valedictorian of my high school and he has published his poems. I referred to him in this post; Robert Lee Haycock. He publishes regularly in "Medusa's Kitchen" and sells his poetry on Amazon.com.

Here's the hilarious part; he's in awe of the way I write and I think I'm not fit to be in the same room with him. It was ever thus with us, though. Funny how things are. I do urge you to check out "Medusa's Kitchen" and Robert Lee Haycock, to see what they're doing. "Medusa" does take unsolicited poems I believe. I'm going to tell you, what I told the 72 year-old man who wanted to play violin, after having a heart attack, and he'd never played before. GO FOR IT! Thanks again for visiting and I wish you all the best! <3 Mary

Viola Fury said...

@Megan!

Thanks for visiting and allowing me to co-host this month! There's nothing wrong with being practical. No one wants to be John Kennedy Toole and die with what was indubitably one of the best books of the 80s sitting in his drawer. So, you're correct in saying that you just have to let it go sometimes. If we've done the best we can, and we've covered all the bases, and even if our "gut" may be screaming "but...." sometimes, we just have to ignore that and move on. Thanks for the advice; that's the thing about writing, or any type of creating really. We just have to let it go. It may not be our best, but hey! At least we're putting something out there! Thanks again for the visit! <3

Viola Fury said...

@Susan!

Thanks for coming by! I understand the need to "turn it over to the professionals" or at least a 2nd pair of eyes. I'll get there soon enough, I know. I know too, that there's always a word here, a turn of phrase there, that maybe isn't as pleasing to us as we would like. That's the hard part; hell, writing is just plain hard. :D Thanks again for the visit!

Viola Fury said...

@joylene!

Thanks for visiting! My parents were something! I'm an only child and I miss them desperately at times. They were both bright and funny people. I'm probably the perfect blend of them both; I have my father's sense of complete silliness and his smarts, and my mother's tenacity and search for the truth. All of this is overlaid by a complete and utter sense of the absurd, with a deep and abiding faith in God. In other words, I'm a hot mess, but it's MY mess! Thanks for letting me co-host; I love this group! The people are wonderful and Alex is something else! Happy IWSG'ing and thanks again for visiting! <3

Viola Fury said...

@Clee!

Thanks for visiting and letting me co-host! I read your post and took careful notes. I agree and it's so odd, because the salient point of all of this is "Everyone finishes their story a different way", BUT, there are some really, really good tips to get your story stick-a-fork-in-it-done! I really appreciate that. The one story I have unearthed to human eyes other than my own is actually now, a link that I forget to add (not a Freudian slip, I swear; I've been really sick) in the first paragraph of this post, called "The Day the Cat Got Out" and it actually has a resolution. Again, thanks for stopping by!

Viola Fury said...

@Christine!

Thanks so much for stopping by! My parents were a pair, all right. A pair of what, we never knew. . . That was a Dad joke, by the way, courtesy of my daddy. I'm not at the point, quite yet for others to critique my work, other than when we have #StoryTime BlogHop. I did show my very first short, short story to public eyes and the link is now on the 1st paragraph of this post, called, "The Day The Cat Got Out" and the story has a resolution. Again, thanks for stopping by!

Viola Fury said...

@Jacqui!

Thanks for coming by! I think you should write a modern day Oedipus and much like Gilbert and Sullivan's Operas, you can just update all the characters! Sounds like a winner to me! Thanks again!

Viola Fury said...

@Karen Lynn!

Thanks so much for the congrats and for allowing me to co-host this month's #IWSG check in! Depending on what you play, or sing, any time is the right time to get on stage. I started playing at the age of 11 and was playing in youth symphonies and what not, by age 13. I majored in Viola Performance (yes, that is a major) and went into symphonic playing long before I had graduated from university. I have spent my entire life playing with professionals and amateurs. It all depends upon your level of confidence. I've seen many excellent professionals be laid completely out by stage fright and they've gone through psycho-therapy, taken Inderol, which is given to musicians with stage fright and so on. Some of them just grow out of it, and some never do.

By the same token, I've seen and shared stands with some very fine amateur players who are wonderful players and can play some professionals under the table. What's the difference? The pros make their living at playing and the amateurs don't. So, that's pretty much become a meaningless term, at least in my book.

The question is this; do you feel ready to try out for a group? Are you ready to get up on a stage and play a solo and be the sole attention of an audience for X amount of time? If you're comfortable with doing either of those things, then get going. I believe everyone who WANTS to play and perform should. There is nothing in this world like live music, and as Nietzsche said "Without music, life would be a mistake". The other thing I want to say is this and it comes from my muse, Beethoven; who is not only my muse for music but for life - we also share the same birthday - "to play a wrong note here and there is forgivable, but to play without passion, is inexcusable!" So, when you do take that stage, do it with passion, courage and the conviction of your art. Play from your heart and it will all go well; I promise. <3

Viola Fury said...

@Elisabeth!

Thank you so much for visiting! It's interesting you should mention the right-brain thing. On top of playing the viola, I also have a degree in computer science and I am 71% left-brained per the Wexler test. So, this complicates things quite a bit. Music is actually 80% rhythm or mathematics, and so, I came to that quite easily, but only after I was an adult. I have to admit that I was flabbergasted to find this out, as I always assumed I was predominantly right-brained, because writing came so easily to me, but I think that has more to do with the immersion in my childhood. The two have learned to co-exist nicely, I think, but I also have a Motor Disorder that made itself known in 2012, so my wiring is just kind of a hot mess anyway! Anyway, thank you so very much for stopping by! <3

Viola Fury said...

@Tamara!

Thanks for coming by! I understand what you mean. I didn't fully appreciate it until college and that was the 2nd go-round for me. The first time, in high school, we read a lot of Yeats and I just didn't get it. Now, as I've read more modern day poets, it's easier for me to go back and read the Transcendentalists and understand them better. Or, maybe I'm just not as dim as I was back then! Thanks again for visiting!

Viola Fury said...

@Em-Musing!

Thanks for visiting! I love that! "The Tweak Queen"; I think I can relate. "Wait! Just one more semi-colon and it will be the American Novel!" Thanks again!

Viola Fury said...

@Shannon!

Music and writing; I can't write lyrics, but I can write prose. I can play, so someone else can write the words! It would be fun to collaborate on something like that! Thanks for visiting and allowing me to co-host!

Viola Fury said...

@Gail!

Thanks so much for stopping by! I always try to find that bright spot. I was truly, truly upset that I had missed the "What Music Means to Me" but in reality, I have the flu and I have a Motor Disorder and anything, even minor, will put me in a funk, but I come out of it quickly, so I'm aware of that and push towards that and keep it up-beat. The sun always comes back out! And yes, my parents were sport models; I miss them, and talking about them is a way of having them visit me! Thanks again for visiting! <3

Viola Fury said...

@Elsie!

Thanks so much for stopping by! Yes, she did! And she stuck 'em in a drawer. I found them after her death. She didn't like to toot her own horn. While she was alive, I did win awards for my rhetorical writing and she was so proud of that. I was taking upper level English and I always sent her all of my papers and my theses; she just busted her buttons over those papers. She was an amazing woman. I've won a couple of little awards on my blog, but more for participation and what-not and the NaNoWriMo2013 Novel Contest. My mother passed away in 2002, but she sits in an urn in my living room, so I'm guessing she probably knows I'm still at it. Thanks again for stopping by!

Viola Fury said...

@Cherie!

Thanks for stopping by! My parents were terrific! I'm sorry you never let anyone read your poems. Maybe you should write some more; I would love to read them!

Viola Fury said...

@Toinette!

Thanks so much for stopping by! I'm glad you enjoyed hearing about my folks! Poetry is a wonderful thing, and I truly believe that some people are "born" to write it, and others aren't. That being said, everyone can learn to do anything with enough hard work. If you find a poem lurking around inside you, you'll have to get it out. I'm at that stage, where I'm letting prose fiction out and maybe later on, I too, will put my hand to writing a poem. Thanks again, Toinette for coming by! <3

Viola Fury said...

@Nancy!

Thanks for stopping by! I actually have a project that I am working on and I forgot to add the link to today's post; it's a short short story that is part of a larger piece that is part of a "Graphic Novel" and it's called "The Day The Cat Got Out" and is in the 1st paragraph of this post. Sorry about that. Thanks again for coming by; let me get my wings spread out here! :D

Viola Fury said...

@Olga!

Thanks for stopping by and allowing me to co-host! I'm glad you enjoyed my parents' stories; I must write some more about them. <3

Pat Garcia said...

Thank you Viola for co-hosting. You know, I believe that the release of every book is difference. Sometimes it takes a year or two to feel like the book is finished and then on another book it may take only three old four months. Books are like children. No two are alike. Each has its own character.
Shalom aleichem,
Patricia

Anonymous said...

Hi Viola! Thanks so much for co-hosting this month's IWSG. Awesome that your mom was a poet. I try, but I'm not very good at it. :) Hugs. Eva

J Q Rose said...

Hi Viola, Poetry like you mention with all the emotion is more "in" today..not the pretty moon, June, spoon rhymes. I'm stuck in the moon, June, style, but I've experimented with non-rhyming too. Not too successfully. I fell in love with Shakespeare's sonnets, tearing them apart for meaning in a college class. Who knew? I'm going to google your favorite poems. Each one is a learning session. Thanks for co-hosting.
JQ Rose

Anonymous said...

Your dad sounds like quite the character, and it's so neat that your mom wrote poetry. I've written a few simple rhyming things, but nothing I'd ever show anyone. Writing poetry is a unique talent. Thanks for co-hosting!

farawayeyes said...

Ha, ha,ha! I too, would have a lot more to say about 'what music means to me'. After having said that I do appreciate this IWSG question, I might not have had a very definitive answer, but I have gotten a lot of ideas from other blog posts.

Heather M. Gardner said...

You can talk about music all you want!

Thank you for co-hosting!

Heather

Chemist Ken said...

I'll have to admit that I never really cared all that much for poetry, but that's just me. One of the guys in my crit group often brings in poetry he's written and asks us for our opinions. Sometimes I understand what he's trying to say, but sometimes I don't.

Thanks for co-hosting this month's IWSG post.

Michelle Wallace said...

Really interesting snippets of info about your parents.
Dover Beach is a wonderful poem. It always reminds me of The World Is Too Much With Us by Wordsworth. They have similarities.
I love poetry too. It's actually my first love but has since been ousted by flash fiction. Actually, the two are at loggerheads. Not sure I can choose a side. There's place for both but the problem is, I read a lot of poetry but don't write enough poetry. *sigh*
Thanks for co-hosting the IWSG this month.

Viola Fury said...

@Pat!

Thanks so much for visiting, and for the honor of being your co-host this month! I've been hearing what you said from several published authors, and while I have not yet published anything, I can attest to the fact that certain pieces I've written take on a different quality years later, when I re-read them. So, are they done? Yes! I'm not one to go back and tinker. I chalk that up to either a change in my own perspective, or maybe I've written something that may seem dated. No matter.

I AM working on a fiction project (book? graphic novel? a bunch of short stories strung together?) and I'm pleased with how it's coming along. I was able to use a portion of it for my first-ever flash fiction for public eyes and received some positive feedback.

I really appreciate you coming by; the writing process is so very much different than the musical one, in it's open-endedness. There is only so much you can do in music; granted it's quite a wide spectrum as far as that goes, but eventually, you will come to a point, where you have to stop with the tinkering and you have to stay within certain perimeters, either the piece is rendered unlistenable. I had this experience recently with a rendition of Sibelius' 2nd Symphony. The conductor imposed tempi that were completely nonsensical and outside the metronome markings and I couldn't get through it.

Writing has no such constraints, unless we're just talking about word salad or running things through the robot-translator; always hilarious to me! Anyway, I'm so pleased to have been your co-host this month and happy that you visited. Shalom alacheim and have a wonderful weekend, Pat! <3 Mary

Viola Fury said...

@lifepostbrainhemorrhage!

Eva! Thank you so much for stopping by, and allowing me the honor of being a co-host! Yes, my mom did love to write; she journaled constantly, and when she started writing poetry, it seemed a natural fit for her. She was a great critic of my own rhetorical writing and was responsible for helping me win an award. I think the point is that we create and keep at it. It's kinda like life; we get knocked down, but we keep getting up. Hang in there, Eva! You're doing great! <3

Viola Fury said...

@J Q Rose!

I believe that you're right about that and I equate that type of poetry with Mozart. I think Mozart wrote two great pieces of music in his life; "Don Giovanni" and his last unfinished work, "Great Mass in C minor", which really evoke passion and regret and longing. Of course, I'm a Beethoven girl; born on the same day, introduced to him at age 4 and he is my muse in both life and music. I've always been that way. I really love Shakespeare's plays and never read his sonnets. I did read tons of the Transcendental poets and Arnold and D. H. Lawrence. Lawrence just really put the hook into me. His poetry is almost febrile with emotion and is so descriptive. Anyway, I want to thank you so much for allowing me to co-host! Mary

Viola Fury said...

@lorimaclaughlin.com

Thanks for visiting and for the honor of being your co-host this month! My father was a hoot and my mom was, as well. My mom was the English major, and she wrote and kept a journal for ages, and I think poetry was just a natural outlet for her, later in life. I'm horrible at it, but then, I cannot write music either, just play it! Again, thanks for stopping by and have a great weekend!

Viola Fury said...

@farawayeyes!

Ugh! It was just one thing on top of several others, and I took the disappointment badly for a bit. Part of the reason I missed it was that I was off playing a rehearsal, so I was off doing the thing that means so much to me. Go figure. I REALLY came to appreciate this question, as I got into reading what others had to say about the process. Like you, I really have no definitive answer, but with the many little tips and ideas, I can tell you that after this month, it might be a bit easier to tell when the story is done. Have a great weekend!

Viola Fury said...

@Michelle Wallace!

Thank you so much for stopping by, and allowing me to be your co-host this month! Dover Beach is one of my favorites; the images it evokes are so nightmarish. I had not read The World Is Too Much With Us, and of course, I had to go and run and read it. I bookmarked it, as I find that there are ALWAYS layers and textures I miss upon one reading. So different than reading prose.

As to flash fiction; I'm dipping into that and beginning to get the bug for it. At first, I really didn't get it, but it sure sharpens up your writing skills and I can always use some more of that! Again, thanks for visiting. I really got a lot out of this month's IWSG and I hope you did too! Have a great weekend!

Viola Fury said...

@Chemist Ken

Ken, this is one of the great things about writing and music. These worlds are so huge that you don't have to like it all. I'm not a particular fan of the Classical era of music, other than Haydn. I loathe Mozart, with the exception of "Don Giovanni" and his last work, which was unfinished at his death "Great Mass in C minor", simply because the Classical era didn't evoke passion, or love, or rage, or anything until Beethoven ended all that forever with his 3rd symphony.

I have dear, dear friends who are poets and they have me read them. Sometimes, I do not get it all, and sometimes, I'm hit squarely between the eyes with the meaning. So, I understand what you're saying. I'm so glad to be your co-host this month, Ken and I hope you have a great weekend!